a good cause

Boy, is my face red

Ahem.

From time to time, I get up on a soapbox proclaiming with zest over something I am passionate about. I usually make every attempt to thoroughly research before doing so. That said, on the subject of the CPSIA, there is so much MISinformation circulating the internet, that I am afraid I might have gotten caught up in the moment.

My dear sweet friend, Jeanette sent me a link from Snopes regarding the CSPIA post I published yesterday.

In effect, it says that it will not affect used children’s clothing, etc, etc, etc…

I now return you back to your regularly scheduled blog reading, albeit with a redder face. 😉

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More on the CPSIA

When I started seeing the “Save the Handmade” signs pop up on the internet, I thought, “how cute” – let’s all save handmade. I had no idea that there was an actual law that had passed placing a ban on items created for children under the age of twelve. I am not sure exactly when I became aware of the law, but I do wish that I had known sooner.

If you stuck me in a court of law, I don’t think enough evidence could be found to ever convict me of being any kind of activist – not because I don’t care, but I’m usually silent on controversial matters. However, I feel so passionately about this because the law is so far reaching and affect so many different aspects of how we will be allowed to raise our children.

As I’ve researched this new law out, I have grown increasingly concerned about a number of things. Shannon from Rocks in My Dryer has posted an informative interview with Heather from Blessed Nest as to how the laws will affect the cottage industry – head over and read that.

Dana, from Principled Discovery has discussed how it will affect homeschoolers as well.

I also discovered a blog written by an environmental attorney, called The Smart Mama and she has been deluged with questions regarding the CPSIA. She interprets the laws in a clear, precise way , and she’s keeping an eye on the everyday happenings – so be sure to bookmark her and check back with her.

Does anyone else besides me view this as a direct attack on our children and family unit?

Let me explain, lest you think I’ve gone off the deep end. For instance, we purchase almost all of our homeschool supplies and clothing second hand. If this law passes, it means that we will be forced to either purchase brand new curriculum every year for each child to the tune of about $1000, or send them to public school. We will also be required to purchase every piece of their clothing from retail stores, instead of buying from ebay, goodwill, or children’s thrift shops. Our friends couldn’t pass down their children’s clothing to my children to wear anymore. Even the ability to sew our kids clothes will be hindered as fabric retailers will be struggling to comply with the new laws – yes, even fabric the retailers purchase after the new law is passed is included, not existing inventory. (Guess I should go buy up some fabric, huh?)

I don’t know about you, but we have been frugally minded for so long that I wouldn’t even know how to shop retail exclusively. It’s not as much fun, honestly. But even more so, it’s not really cost-effective when you have three kids that are constantly growing and changing tastes in clothes.

While some of you might consider me a conspiracy theorist, I really see this as a good law intended to protect our children gone bad in the hands of people who want more control.

Please help get the word out – let’s bring some attention to this law – post about it – tweet it using the hashtag #CSPIA every time you talk about it – link to others who are writing about it. Call your local representatives.

Do something.

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Used Children’s Books in Jeopardy – please help!

I received this email on a homeschooling site and wanted to pass it on to those of you that might not be aware that there is a possibility of the fact that we will no longer be able to resell “used” Children’s books for homeschooling. I am in the process of researching this out and found the CPSCIA link regarding these items and this is what it says:

Does the new requirement for total lead on children’s products apply to children’s books, cassettes and CD’s, printed game boards, posters and other printed goods used for children’s education?

In general, yes. CPSIA defines children’s products as those products intended primarily for use by children 12 and under. Accordingly, these products would be subject to the lead limit for paint and surface coatings at 16 CFR part 1303 (and the 90 ppm lead paint limit effective August 14, 2009) as well as the new lead limits for children’s products containing lead (600 ppm lead limit effective February 10, 2009, and 300 ppm lead limit effective August 14, 2009). If the children’s products use printing inks or materials which actually become a part of the substrate, such as the pigment in a plastic article, or those materials which are actually bonded to the substrate, such as by electroplating or ceramic glazing, they would be excluded from the lead paint limit. However, these products are still considered to be lead containing products irrespective of whether such products are excluded from the lead paint limit and are subject to the lead limits for children’s products containing lead. For lead containing children’s products, CPSIA specifically provides that paint, coatings, or electroplating may not be considered a barrier that would render lead in the substrate inaccessible to a child.

*****UPDATED TO ADD a link I received from another homeschool mom with clarification for resellers****

And now for the note I received:

Oh, how I wish this were a joke! But it is a grim and looming, almost Orwellian, reality.

Effective February 10th, in the United States, the sale of all children’s books (books intended for children ages 12 and under) is to be PROHIBITED. Every single book printed prior to the ruling is affected, whether new or used. New books in production are required to include a “lead-free” certification and will be the only books that are legal to offer for sale.

What does this mean to the homeschooling family?

Well, for one, curriculum fairs across the country will be cancelled as book vendors scramble to figure out how to comply with the new ruling. Complete book inventories will have to be destroyed — the ruling even prohibits giving away the books! Local thrift stores will be hard hit — most will likely have to close their doors — yes, even Goodwill and Salvation Army.

Clothing, toys and books — even CDs and DVDs are included in the ruling. Thrift stores will no longer be able to accept or process anything (including clothing) that would be intended for a child.

No more library sales. Libraries will not be permitted to give away or sell book donations. It is unsure yet, however, how the libraries’ shelves themselves will be impacted (the ruling doesn’t explicitly mention “loaning” books, just selling or giving them away). The key word, however, is “distribution” –libraries may well be required to destroy books from their shelves.

(The ruling that originally passed was about toys, but the EPA has since made a statement that clothing, books and media are included in “children’s toys”.)

Just how serious is this new law?

Amazon.com has already notified all vendors of their need to comply. No book can be sold at the Amazon site that was printed prior to compliance. And the “compliance” must be coordinated at the manufacturing stage. At the time of this article there is no clause to be able to grandfather-in older books or even rare out-of-print
books. It can cost between $500 and $1500 to test a book for lead.

I happen to own a children’s bookstore specializing in living books from the 1950s and ’60s. My punishment for selling a book after February 10th? Up to $100,000 and 5 years in jail. And yes, it is a felony charge. For selling a SINGLE book.

(Although I don’t think the S.W.A.T. team scenario would become a reality overnight, at the same time I would be leery of blatantly violating Federal law.)

So what can you do to help save your local used bookstore that sells children’s books? Or that homeschool curriculum business? Or your EBay business selling children’s items?

ACT NOW before the quickly approaching deadlines:

1) Email or call the CPSIA – the office of the CPSC ombudsman at 888-531-9070.

Comments on Component Parts Testing accepted through January 30, 2009. Or mail: Sec102ComponentPartsTesting@cpsc.gov

2) Contact your local representatives. For their contact information, just enter your zip code.

3) Make your voice heard by voting on this issue! The top 3 in each category will be presented to President-elect Obama.

4) Sign the petition.

5) Spread the word! Forward this article. Send an email. Write about this on your blog. Tell others about this issue and encourage them to do the same.

Sincerely,
Heather Idoni
http://www.BelovedBooks.com

For the complete story, read the following links:

ABOUT THE NEW LAW

Summaries on Legislation Index page for Children’s Products Containing Lead

Office of the General Counsel FAQ on retroactive inventory requirements — The use of forward effective dates appears to force current inventories to adhere to the ruling on February 10th, 2009.

Specific FAQ on their interpretation of books and other media to be included in the testing of lead based products.

Effective Date: Lead content limit of 600 ppm becomes effective 180 days after enactment. An advisory opinion regarding the application of the new lead limit to inventory existing at the effective date can be found on our web site.

Getting the Lead out. There is no lead in children’s books.

From a Pediatrician.

What are your thoughts on this, folks? Will you join me in contacting our government?

{Karen}

PS – A saying, attributed to Ben Franklin, constantly circulates in my mind. You’ve heard it: “Those who would give up Essential Liberty to purchase a little Temporary Safety, deserve neither Liberty nor Safety.” American Vision Article on Safety’s War on Thrift/

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A Cultural Mandate

It’s the day before the election and thus far, I have been mostly silent on the issues of the election and have managed to avoid the mudslinging that is circulating on both sides via the internet and tv campaigns. Mostly, it’s because I’m not that good at voicing my opinions and thoughts as eloquently as Shannon or Dana, but even more so, I think it’s because in my heart, I’m a peacemaker, and I don’t like conflict. At all.

However, since today is the day before the election, I felt it necessary to speak about something. I have heard many Christians say that they will not even vote this year because they don’t like the choices that have been presented to them, which is shocking to me for many reasons. If you are a Bible-believing Christian, you should realize that whether we like it or not, these are the candidates that God has chosen for us. Yep, God chose them. He’s allowed them to get this far – and the rest is up to us.

In Genesis 1:28, the Bible states that God created us to “have dominion over the fish of the sea, and over the fowel of the air, and over the calttle, and over all the earth, and over every creeping thing that creepeth upon the earth.”

I believe that as a Christian, I am a regent of God and must take my cultural mandate (or influence) to the voting polls and vote for the person who I believe most closely will adhere to the standards of the Bible.

I believe that it is time that we as Christians stand up together and speak up by getting ourselves to the voting polls and having some Godly influence. The duty is ours, the results are God’s.

Please take three minutes and view this video, from a pastor at our local church, which further explains the reasoning we should use when we vote. The reasons are sound and the choice is clear.

Now, go vote tomorrow.

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Can you spare 20 seconds?

Okay, y’all. I have a huge favor to ask of you if you have the time. {insert big grin here}

My dear, sweet, beautiful niece, Brooke VanOoyen, needs your help. She is a senior this year and is up for a $1000 college scholarship photo contest on this site. It would be a tremendous blessing for her to win that scholarship – it would pay for her books for the first year of college, and I know her mom would really appreciate not having to pay that out of her own pocket (what mom wouldn’t?)

The problem is, she only has 26 votes! The top person has over 700! I only have about 438 folks subscribed to my blog at this time, and I know that not everyone will even see this or much less read it. But I’m asking that those of you who DO see it and read it, just click over to this site and find her name “Vanooyen, Brooke” and vote for her.

Really? It takes about 20 seconds. What’s 20 seconds out of your life? Unless you’re a snail…then I suppose it would be a lot.

Thanks in advance.

And if you haven’t entered my giveaway for Photoshop CS3, you can enter it by clicking here and leaving a comment and your email address…because I’d like to contact you. You know, if you win.

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BlogHop ’08 – Come on in!

BlogHOP 08 PartyHi there! My name is Karen and I’m your hostess for tonight’s BlogHop ’08 here at Simply Amusing Blog. Phew! You caught me with my hair still in curlers and my face unmade!

I’ve been working on blog designs all day and haven’t even had a chance to make anything super-fab for us to eat – and I’m famished, how about you? Let’s see…I’ve got some queso and chips…that’s about as good as it gets in my house on the spur of the moment…I’ll throw em in a bowl for us to share. Want some Diet Dr. Pepper? It’s either that or sweet tea, I’m afraid.

There’s a lot of partying going on tonight – so why not just subscribe to my feed and then you can have me delivered right to your inbox in the morning? Go now! Visit our fellow bloggers!

Photobucket

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